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\ 



FOREIGN CROPS AND MARKETS 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL. ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON D. C. 



Vol. 35 September 4, 1937 No. 10 



LATE CABLES... 

Harvesting of grain in Canadian Prairie Provinces advanced rapidly 
during the week ended August 31, especially in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, 
where warm dry weather permitted the work to go forward without interrup- 
tion. Wheat yields in Manitoba generally satisfactory, as to both quan- 
tity and quality except in dry areas. In Saskatchewan, quality of grain 
good but average yields low. Cool, rainy weather delayed maturity in 
Alberta, but good wheat yields are expected if favorable weather pre- 
vails. Grasshopper damage fairly extensive throughout the three Provinces- 
with indications pointing to a heavy infestation next season. (Domin- 
ion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. 

Preliminary Soviet official estimate of the "biological " crop of 
all grains (in which large harvesting losses are not, as a rule, taken into 
account) exceeds 7 billion poods (126,000,000 short tons), or 50 percent 
above last year. This estimate, however, is considered far too optimis- 
tic. Large harvesting losses are expected. See "Foreign Crops and Mar- 
kets" for July 26, 1937, p. 46. (Berlin office, Bureau of Agricultural 
Economics . ) 

England and Wales hops acreage in 1937 placed by British Ministry 
at 18,070 compared with 18,030 acres in 1936. (Agricultural Attache 
C. C. Taylor, London.) 

Southern Rhodesia tobacco auction closed August 14. Total auction 
sales 18,560,000 pounds, about same quantity as last year. All possible 
scrap sold. Season price average 10.176 pence (about 20.86 cents) per 
pound, 43 percent above last year. Strong market for medium and lower 
cigarette grades. (P. G. Minneman, tobacco specialist, London.) 

Sydney wool sales opened August 30. Competition good. Continent 
and Yorkshire chief buyers. Japan not operating. Compared with closing 
previous series June 10, prices par to 5 percent higher. (Agricultural 
Attache C. C. Taylor, London.) 

Germany announces a reduction of 9 percent in the price of cell- 
wool a synthetic substitute for raw cotton made from cellulose. Effective 
September 1, the price was 145 pfennigs per kilo (about 26 cents per 
pound) against te former price of 160 pfennigs per kilo (about 29 cents 
per pound) for Quality B. That quality represents 80 percent of the total 
production of cellwool, and is the grade used in the cotton-textile 
industry. Prices of other grades have been reduced correspondingly. 
(Agricultural Attache L. V. Steere, Berlin.) 



158 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 35, No. 10 



COTTON 

Manchurian c otton acreage shows slight increa se 



Cotton acreage in Manchuria this season is estimated at 10 
percent above that of 1936, according to a report received from Owen 
L. Dawson, Agricultural Commissioner at Shanghai. The area for last 
year was reported at 200,000 acres compared with 166,000 as the average 
for the 3 years, 1933-1935. With favorable climatic conditions, the 
1937 crop is expected to reach about 85,000 bales (478 pounds net) 
compared with 67,000 bales produced last season and 56,000 as the 
average for 1933-1935. 

A 20-year cotton program was launched by the new government in 
Manchuria in 1933, with a view to expanding plantings until they reached 
735,000 acres by 1950. The plan anticipated a crop by 1950 of approxi- 
mately 415,000 bales of lint, which would be equivalent to a yield of 
about 270 pounds per acre. During the 4 years, 1933-1936, since the 
inauguration of the expansion program, the yield has averaged only 161.6 
pounds of lint per acre. During the same period, the yield in the United 
States has averaged 192.1 pounds. 

Because of unfavorable weather in Manchuria during recent years, 
farmers have not secured large enough returns from cotton to change ex- 
tensively from other crops to cotton. Some authorities in Manchuria be- 
lieve that it is undesirable to attempt to expand cotton acreage rapidly 
until further experimenta,l work has been carried on for at lea.st 4 or 
5 years to acclima/tize successfully suitable varieties and strains. 

There are five cotton mills located in Manchuria with a total of 
180,000 spindles and 2,400 looms. The present estimated consumption of 
raw cotton by these mills. is 136,000 bales annually. It is estimated 
that about 115,000 bales of raw cotton will be imported into Manchuria 
during the 1936-37 crop year (October to September) . Only a small per- 
centage of the domestic crop is now used by Manchurian mills, while the 
remainder is consumed largely in household industries. 



MANCHURIA: Imports of raw cotton, October-April, 1935-36 and 1936-37 
(in bales of 478 pounds net) 



Source 







Bale s 


: Bales 






16,505" 


! 24,005 






• . 146 


; 197 






41 , 650 


; 66, 654 






1,630 


■ 5,848 






83 


981 






60,014 


97,685 



October - April 



1935-36 



1936-37 



"Manchoukuo " Monthly Foreign Trade Returns. 



September 4, 1937 Foreign Crops and Markets 



159 



FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND HUTS 

C anadia n f ruit crops larger 

The apple, peach, and plum crops in Canada are reported larger 
this year than in 1936, "but pear production will be slightly smaller 
than last year, according to the Agricultural Branch of the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics. Approximate percentage increases above the 1936 
production figures are for apples 25 percent, for peaches 46 percent, 
and for plums and prunes 36 percent. Because of the comparatively 
small crop of pears in Ontario, total pear production for the Dominion 
will be about 7 percent below that of last year. 

CANADA: Estimates of fruit production by Provinces, 
1935 - 1937 



Item and Province 1935 ' 1936 1937 a/ 



: Bushels \ Bushels : Bushels 

Nova Scotia ■ 5,400,000 ! 5,250,000 j 7,200,000 

New Brunswick ' 97,500 : 87,000 : 121,800 

Quebec i 666,000 : 273,000 : 519,000 

Ontario : 2,181,000 : 2,110,500 : 2,194,500 

British Columbia : 5,144,700 j 4,625, 100 : 5 T 403. 000 

Total : ia*4fia^2QQ_j 12 ,345, 6Q0' | 15,428,300 

P eache s ; I . : 

Ontario i 575,000 j 402,300 j 503,000 

British Columbia ; 44.600 : '' . .27.870 V 125,330 

Total ; 619.600 ,j 430, 1 70 628,330 

Pears j : '• 

Ontario .. .. j 190,000 : 196,800 : 147,600 

British Columbia : 226.100 j 2 24,300 I 245,50 0 

Total : 415,100 j 421,100 • 393,200 

Pl ums and prun es ; 

Ontario ~ ! 110,000 j 41,200 ; 58,900 

British Columbia \ 1 45,100 ; 102,460 ; 136,830 

Total j 255,100 ' 143,660 : 195,730 



Compiled by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in cooperation with the 
Bruit Branch of the Department of Agriculture, a/ Preliminary. 

Cuban export s of avocados to U nited States heav y- - • 

Exports of avocados from Cuba to the United States amounted to 
4,473,650 pounds during the period June 1 - July 31, the largest quantity 
shipped in a like period since 1933, according to a communication from 
Harold S. Tewe 11, .American Consul at Habana. Voluntary restrictions have 
been in effect this season, limiting the minimum size of the fruit ex- 
ported to New York to 16 ounces each, that to Florida to 15 ounces, and 
that to New Orleans' to 14 ounces. These voluntary restrictions on size 



160 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 35, No. 10 



will probably continue until the end of the season, although existing 
regulations permit the export of fruit weighing as little as 12 ounces. 

LIVESTOCK, MEATS, AND T700L \.. 

Shanghai dried egg situa tion . 

Shanghai stocks of dried eggs in all forms were reported normal 
for the 'season at the middle of August when hostilities started .'in that 
area, according to a radiogram received from the Shanghai office of the 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Shanghai is the most important egg- 
drying center in China. Almost the entire stocks are in the fighting 
zone and in danger of destruction by fire and shelling. Shipments prior 
to the beginning of hostilities were not large, and removal from storage 
for shipment has since been impossible. Plants are not operating, and 
supplies of fresh eggs for drying are practically nil. 

United States quota for bee f c attle filled' early 

Imports of beef cattle under the low-duty 'Quota' during July and 
the first 2 weeks of August were four times as large as the correspond- 
ing imports in 1936. As a result, the quota of 155, 799 head was filled 
about August 12 or 13 as against November 28-30 last year. , Imports of 
cattle in this weight group ran below those of 1936 until the end of 
June; but in July they were higher than in any other month of 1937 ex- 
cept January, whereas last year such imports declined' drastically after 
June 30. Imports of heavy beef cattle from Canada this year have ac- 
counted for 84.3 percent of the total as against nearly' 86 percent in 
1936. Mexican cattle made up a correspondingly larger proportion of the 
quota this year than last. 



UNITED STATES: Imports of beef cattle weighing 700 pounds or more, 
January 1 - August 14, 1937, with comparisons. 



Period 


Canada 


Mexico 


Total 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 




Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


January. 


8,574 


21,536 


2,319 


6,327 


10,893 


27,872. 


February. 


8,683 


14,120 


3,291 


3,475 


11,974 


17,595 


March 


14,604 


14,150 


6,053 


4,352 


20,664 


18,502' 


April. 


34,370 


11,152 


3,191 


3,549 


37,563 


14, 732 


May. 


23,747 


12,710 


4,027 


4, 841 


27,785 


17,562 


June ...»••....... , 


20,738 


11,098 


666 


986 


21,413 


12,084 


To June 30 

July 1 - Aug. 14.. 
To August 14. 


110,7.16 


84. 766 


19 . 547 


23,530 


130.292 


108.347 


10,624 


46,899 


313 


846 


10,908 


47,694 


121 , 340 


131,665 


19,860 


24, 376 


141,200 


156,041 



January - June figures from official records of the Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce; July 1— August 14 figures from preliminary 
reports of the Customs Bureau. 



September 4, 19.37 



AUSTRIA-: Area and production of specified grains, 1933-1937 



Mb 



Year 



Wheat 
(winter) 

~~ .Product" 



Area 



1,000 



tip n .jj|rea 



1,000 



Rye 
(winter) 



SProdUc- 
tion , 



,000 



1,000 



Winter 
•i^roduo- 



1,000 





acres 


bushels 


acres 


bushels 


acres' 


bushel 4 


acres 


bushels 


acres 


, "bushels 


1932 


515 


11,886 


916 


23,543 


18 


506 j 


405 


12,083 


423 


12,589 


1933 


523 


14,225 


917 


26,314 


20 


601 ' 


403 


14,690 


423 


15,291 


1934 


546 


12,783 


901 


21,853 


31 


588 \ 


393; 


12,950 


412 


13,538 


1935 


569 


, 14,844 


886 


23,684 


22 


620 i 


38Cj 


11,795 


402 


12,415 


1936 


592 


12,816 


905 


. 17,503 


. 21 


551 i 


373; 


11,074 


394 


11,625 


1937 


597 


13,375 


755 


16,141 


25 


689 


373 


11,620! 


397 


12,309 



Spring 



Total 



"Jproduo-': 
Area I tion |Afga 



Produc- 
! tion 

1,00Q ' 1,000 1,000/ 1,000 



International Institute .of Agriculture, Rome. 



WHEAT, INCLUDING FLOUR: Shipments from principal exporting countries 
_ as given by current trade so urces, 1935*-*56 to 193 7-38 



Country 



Total 
s hipments 



1935-36 



1936-37 



Shipments 1937 
week ended 



Aug. 14 



Aug. 21 



Aug. 28 



Shipments 
July l~Aug. 28 



1936 



1937 



North America a/ 
Canada, 

4 markets b/« . 
United States d/ 

Argentina 

Australia 

U.S.S.R 

3anr.be and Bulgaria e/ 
British 

India. 

Total g/.... ; 

?otal European 

m shipments a/,, 

"otal ex-Surobean 
-jaigments j.7 



1,000 
bus hels 

220,464 

246,199 
7,21 9 

787312 
110,576 
29 , 024 
8,312 

2,556 

440,244 



1,000 
bushels 



225,902 

194,531 
10,049 



1,000 
b ushels 

2,518 

1,417 
1,529 



1,000 
bushels 



1,000 
bushels 



1,000 
bushels 



3,870 

678 
1,293 



2,851 



164,678 
105,835 
88 

65 ,544 

4/ ij 

12,253 



876 
1,472 
0 

584 
336 



853 
917 
88 
872 

352 



§51 
1,440 

456 
1,544 

248 



50,104 

0/ 
38,003 

cj 957 



1,000 
trashels 

21,791 

0/ 

8,673 
c/6,741 



8,576 
9,496 

0 

6,248 
496 



6,736 
11,325 
728 
4,848 

4,720 



574,306 



3£Cu26A 



484,. 600 



■5.048. 



131,760 



127,192 



1,496 



74,920 



50,148 



57 



r C\T~nl 1 — — ■ 1 — « — 1 — 1 ■ — ~ .... At . 

replied from official and trade sources, a/ Broomhall's Cora Trade News. 
J Port William, Port Arthur, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and New Westminster. 
2/ To Augaat 21. ( d/ Official, e/ Black Sea shipments only, f/ Total of 9 
-onth Bt g/ Total' of trade figures includes North America as reported by 
fcooohall. h/ To August 14. 



162 



■ foreign-; Cfcrojwi afift' Markets Vol. 35, No. 10 

WHEAT: ■■■ Closing Saturday prices of -September futures a/ 



Date 


Chicago 


Kansas 


City 


Minneapolis 


Winnipeg bf, Liverpool b 


/ Buenog 
•/Aires c.l 


1936 




1936 


1937. 


1936 


1937 


1936 : 1937 ; 1936 : 1937. 


1936 


193? 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents [Cents iGents -Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


H igh d/ . . « . 


114 


128 


118 


124 


132 


144 


108 ; 146 j 117 j 145 


Q?U7 


126 


Low d/. . . . . 


97 


104 


93 


98 


110 


114 


84 : 122 •: 89 • 123 


e/ 92 


120 


Aug. 7..... 


112 


113 


115 


106 


131 


125 


104 : 125 j 116 • 128 


f/107 


123 


14. .... 


111 


112 


117 


104 


129 


122 


101 i 129 ; 112 ■ 128 


f/110 


123 


21 


113 


106 


116 


99 


128 


114 


100 i 123 i 112 I 124 


106' 


124 


28. . . . , 


110 


104 


112 


98 


128 


114 


96 1 122 i 107 125 


102 


' 123 



a/ October futures for Winnipeg and Liverpool, b/ Conversions at noon buying rata 
of exchange, c/ Prices are of day previous to other prices, d/ July 1 to date, 
e/ September and October futures, f / October futures. 

WHEAT: Weighted average cash price at stated markets' 





All classes 


No. 


2 


Wo. 


1 


: No. 


2 Hard No. 


2 


. Western 


Week 
ended 


and grades Hard Winter 
six market Kansas City 


Dk.N. Spring 
Minneapolis 


Amber Durum :Red Winter 
Minneapolis : St, Louis 


White 
Seattle a/ 




1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


: 1936 


1937 


1936 ; 


1937 


193 6 : 1937 




JloJits 


123 


126 






Cent i 


i .Cents 


Cent 3 Cents 


Cents 


Cents Cents 


High b/. . 


128 


125 


150 


156 


: 166 


148 


120 j 


128 


100 ; 11? 


Low b/. «... 


99 


107 


100 


108 


124 


130 


: 125 


115 


96 : 


107 


. 82.'- 97 


Aug. 7..... 


127 


107 


122 


113 


150 


139 


: 166 


138 


116 i 


114 


97: 102 


14..... 


128 


107 


122 


112 


144 


137 


; 148 


124 


118 i 


111 


97: 101 


21 ..... 


127 


107 


126 


109 


144 


130 


j 144 


121 


120 : 


109 


100 :' 9? 


28 . . , . * 


121 


110 


120 


108 


143 


130 


; 143 


115 


117. ; . 


107 


'96: - 



i 

:e 
I 
i 
k 
t 
;s 
:i 



a/ Weekly average of daily cash quotations, basis No. 1 sacked. •• b/ 'July 1 to date. 

RUMANIA: Production of specified grains, 1932-1937 



Tear \ 


Wheat 


Rye 


Barley 


: ...Corn 


19*52 • ■# to o ««oe*tt«*«»«*t>»* 


1.000 bushels 


1,000 bushels 


1,000 bushels 


1,000 bushels 


j 55,537 
119,072 
76,553 
96,439 
128,715 
135,987 


10,513 
17,555 
8,308 
12,724 
17,842 
■ 17,401 


67,385 
86,543 
40,019 
42,430 
74,033 
39,086 


: ' 235,930 
i 179.29S 
; 190,782 

211,™ 
220,932 
165,462 








1,9 o 7* ♦ a **«««••»«*•*•••*>• 



International Institute of Agriculture, Rome. 



September 4, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



163 



FEED GRAINS AND RYE: Weekly average price per bushul of corn, rye, 





Com 


— o 

Rye 


Oat 


s 


Barley 






Chicago 


•Puerto 8 Aires 


Minneapolis 


Chic 


ago 


Minneapolis 


Week ' 
ended 


No. 3 
Yellow 


Tut 


-ures ; Futures 


; NO . 


2 


No. 3 
White 


NO . 


d 




_19.I3.S_ 


■ 


i 1936; 193 7 : 193 6 


1937 


1236 


1937 


1936 


_i?37 


1936 


1937 




Goats. 


Cents. 


Coats. 


Qejitt_:ClfijQ__. 


Gs_it__ 


Qiuvts 
84 


Casts. 


C_n,tji 


Cents 


■Cents 


Cents 


High b/.. 


118 


138 


114 


127 : 54 


57 


117 


44 


55 


: 125 


137 


Low \l . . . 


59 


103 


58 : 
Sept. : 


95 • 43 
Sept. jSept. 


54 
Sept. 


48 


75 


25 


30 


| 58 


61 


July 31.. 


99 


103 


97 • 


95 ;c/49 
98 :c/53 


55 


79 


83 


39 


31 


92 


71 


Aug. 7. . 


111 


110 


106 ;' 


55 


83 


79 


44 


30 


107 


67 


' 14.. 


110 




106 ; 


100 ;c/51 


56 


80 


81 


44 ' 


30 . 


125 


62 


21.. 


118 


105 


114 | 


97 : 54 , 


54 


84 


75 


46 


31 


128 


61 


28.. 


114 


104 


110 ' 


97 : 52 


54 


82 


74 


45 


30 1 


129 


62 



averages of daily quotations 
c/ August delivery. 



jrages of reported sales; future prices are simple 
b/ For period January 1 to latest date shown. 



FEED GRAINS: Movement from principal exporting countries 



Commodity 
■ and- 
country 



BAELEY, EXPORTS: fi/j 

United States.. 

Canada 

Argentina 

Danube & U.S.SJ 
Total ........ 

OATS, EXPORTS: c 

United States.. 

Canada........ , 

Argentina 

Danube & U.S.S.R. 

Total 

COM.BXPORTS: d/ 

United States . . 

Danube & U.S.S.R. 

Argentina...... 

South Africa. . . 
Total 

Uni ted States 
imports 



Exports 
for yea__ 



Shipmonts 1937, 



1935-36 


1936-37 


Aug. 14 


Aug. 21 


Aug. 28 


July 1 

to 


1936-37 

V 


1937-38 


1,000 
bushels . 
9,886 I 
6,882 
9,994 
. 41,090 . 


1,000 
bushels 
5,153 
18,880 
14-, 668 
26,315 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


Aug. 21 
July 31 
Aug . 21 
Aug. 28 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


344 

87 
1,040 


83 
9 

1,032 


792 


1,305 
1,892 
938 
2,400 


1,127 

568 
441 
4,373 


67.852 : 


65,016 














1,429 : 
14,892 
10,855 . 

1,390 


912 
10,257 
24,600 

940 


324 

49 
60 


85 

0 
0 


28 
0 


Aug. 21 
July 31 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 


8 

1,771 

662 
170 


472 
722 
2,509 
160 


..28,5<55_ 


36.709 














880 
14,939 
266,143 
21,882 


885 
14,984 
307,636 
8,913 


2 

204 
7,614 
1,207 


3 
9 

7,389 
1,657 


196 
6,744 
1,302 


Nov. 1 tC 
Aug. 21 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 


717 
13,275 
222,792 
7,247 


251 
24, 227 
329,810 
13,324 


293,844 


332.420 














41,141 


24,521 








June 30 


9.405 


62,858 



Exports as far 
' fis , reported 



f ABa * ram otiicial and trade sources, a/ The weeks shown xn these 
nearest to the date shown, b/ Preliminary, c/ Year beginning July 1. &/ 
c sg:umir_g November 1. 



umns are 
Year 



164 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. £5, No. 10 



Index 



Page 

Late cables , . . . 157 



Avocados, exports, Cuba, 

1936, 1937. 159 

Barley: 

Area, Austria, 1932-1937.... 161 

Production; 

Austria, 1932-1937 161 

Rumania, 1932-1937 162 

Cattle (beef): 

Imports, U.S., 1936,1937., 160 

Quota (import) U.S., 1936,1937.. 160 
Cellwool, prices, Germany, 

Sept. l/l937 157 

Corn, production, Rumania, 

1932-1937. 132 

Cotton: 

Area, Manchuria, 1936,1937 158 

Imports, Manchuria, 1936,1937... 158 
Eggs (dried), situation, 

Shanghai, Aug-. 15, 1937 160 

Fruit (fresh), production, 

Canada, 1935-1937. 159 

Grains: 

Harvesting conditions, Prairie 

Provinces, Aug. 31, 1937 157 



; Grains, cont'd: Page 

; Movement (feed), principal 

: countries, Aug. 28, 1937 163 

: prices (feed), principal 

: markets, Aug. 28, 1937 163 

: production, U.S.S.R., 1937 15? 

: Hops, acreage, U.K., 1936, 1937. ... 15? 

: Rye: 

: Area, Austria (winter) 1932-1937 161 

: prices, U.S., Aug. 28, 1937 163 

j Production: 

Austria (winter) 1932-1937.... 161 

: Rumania, 1932-1937 162 

: Tobacco, sales, Southern 

• Rhodesia, 1937'. 15? 

: VTheat: 

: Area, Austria (winter), 

: 1932-1937 lei 

: Prices, specified markets, 

: Aug. 28, 1937 . 162 

» production: 

: Austria (winter), 1932-1937... 161 

: Rumania, 1932-1937 . . . 162 

: Shipments, principal countries, 

: Aug. 28, 1937. 161 

: Wool, sales, Sydney, Australia, 

: Aug. 30, 1937 ^